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9 ways native speakers express anger in Spanish!

9 Ways Native Speakers Express ANGER in Spanish!

Hola amigos, yo soy Juan, and today you’ll learn how to… Epa, estás moviendo la cámara (Hey, you’re moving the camera).

Está bien, tranqui. Vamos de nuevo. (That’s okay, easy. Let’s go again.)

Hola amigos, yo soy Juan and tod…

Pero bueno ¿y entonces? Otra vez. (So, now what? Again.)

Hola amigos, yo soy J- CARAJO QUÉ BUENA VAINA CONTIGO, ¿HASTA CUANDO? ¿QUÉ ES LO QUE TE PASA A TI, CHICO? (#$%@ WHAT’S THE DEAL WITH YOU, TILL WHEN? WHAT’S UP WITH YOU, PAL?)

That’s right: I’m showing you 10 chunks to express anger in Spanish y buscarte una pelea  (and pick a fight), if desired.  

Here’s the first one…

1. Te estás pasando de la raya (You’ve crossed the line)

Use this when someone is pushing it too far, and it’s starting to get annoying. Look at how it can be used:

ACTOR 1
¡Tu mamá es gorda y vieja!
(Your mom is fat and old!)

ACTOR 2
¡Jajaja, la tuya también!
(Hahaha, yours as well!)

ACTOR 1
¿Y tus hermanos? ¡Todos unos perdedores!
(And your brothers? All of them are losers!)

ACTOR 2
¡Jajaja, es verdad!
(Hahaha, that’s true!)

ACTOR 1
¡Y el Boca es una porquería de equipo!
(And Boca is a crappy team!)

ACTOR 2
Te pasaste de la raya con eso.
(You’ve crossed the line with that.)

2. Me tienes hasta la coronilla (Lit.: You have me up to the crown / I’ve had it up to here)

The literal meaning for this one makes no sense in English, but it means I ran out of patience, so use this chunk as a whole when something like this happens:

ACTOR
Sí, ¿hola?
(Yes, hello?)

SELLER
Hola señor, mi nombre es Juan y quiero ofrecerle una gran oportunidad para ser su propio jefe.
(Hello Sir, my name is Juan and I want to show you a great opportunity to be your own boss.)

ACTOR
Gracias, no estoy interesado.
(Thank you, I’m not interested.)

*next day*

ACTOR
Hola… es usted de nuevo.
(Hello… it’s you again.)

SELLER
Hola señor, mi nombre es Juan y quiero ofrecerle una gran oportunidad para ser su propio jefe.
(Hello Sir, my name is Juan and I want to show you a great opportunity to be your own boss.)

ACTOR 
Ya le dije que no estoy interesado, gracias.
(I already told you I’m not interested, thank you)

*next day*

ACTOR
¿Hola? ¿OTRA VEZ USTED?
(Hello? YOU AGAIN?)

SELLER
Hola señor, mi nombre es Juan y quiero ofrecerle una gran oportunidad—
(Hello Sir, my name is Juan and I want to show you a great opportunity--)

ACTOR
¡QUE NO QUIERO! ¡YA NO ME MOLESTES MÁS! ¡ME TIENES HASTA LA CORONILLA!
(I TOLD YOU I DON’T WANT IT! STOP BOTHERING ME ALREADY! I'VE HAD IT UP TO HERE!)

3. Poner los puntos sobre las íes (Lit.: Draw the dots over the i’s / Set the record straight)

So this guy is doing something wrong or getting on your nerves, and you definitely have to say something about it and try to teach him a lesson, ve y ponle los puntos sobre las íes (Lit.:go and draw the dots over the i’s/set the record straight) like this:

ACTOR 1
El tipo andaba tocando corneta, a toda velocidad, paraba los autos, se atravesaba, no respetaba los semáforos…
(This dude was honking the horn, speeding, blocking cars, driving in the middle, didn't respect the traffic lights…)

ACTOR 2
¿En serio? Qué mal. ¿Y qué hiciste?
(Really? That’s terrible. So what did you do?)

ACTOR 1
Bueno, atravesé mi carro en la carretera, me bajé y le puse los puntos sobre las íes al tipo ese.
(Well, I parked my car in the middle of the road, got out and I set the record straight to that guy.)

ACTOR 2
¡Qué bien, seguro aprendió! ¿Y luego qué pasó?
(Awesome, he sure learned his lesson! And then what happened?)

ACTOR 1
Luego me di cuenta que era una ambulancia, así que necesito que me vengas a buscar a la comisaría. 
(Then I realized it was an ambulance, so I need you to pick me up at the police station.)

4. Me saca de mis casillas (Lit.: It takes me out of my frames / It really gets me angry)

Do you know the kind of people that literally make you break out, get under your skin and just have a talent to make you angry? Well, in Spanish we have an expression for that:

ACTOR 1
*taps on the table*

ACTOR 2
Ya deja eso, me saca de mis casillas.
(Stop that already, it really gets me angry.)

5. No me busques porque me vas a encontrar (Don’t look for me because you will find me)/ Buscando lo que no se te ha perdido (Looking for that which you haven’t lost)

This expression is normally used as a warning when someone’s pushing it too far and it means that they’re probably not ready to handle that response they’re looking for.

ACTOR 1
Esa que te saludó es la hermana de Carlos, ¿no?
(That girl who greeted you is Carlos’ sister, right?)

ACTOR 2
Sí. ¿Por qué?
(Yeah. Why?)

ACTOR 1
No por nada, por nada. Epa y ¿tiene novio?
(No reason, no reason. And does she have a boyfriend?)

ACTOR 2
Sí, sí tiene. Es novia de un policía.
(Yes, she does. She’s the girlfriend of a cop.)

ACTOR 1
Ah, ya ya. ¿Y sabes si el novio es celoso?
(Oh, right, right. And do you know if the boyfriend is the jealous type?)

ACTOR 2
Ay Juan… ¡deja de estar buscando lo que no se te ha perdido!
(Hey Juan… stop looking for what you haven’t lost!)

6. Este sí tiene bolas/ huevos (This person has some balls)

In Latinamerica we have maaaany expressions that have to do with testicles. So, perdón resto del mundo, pero amamos hablar de los testículos aquí. (Sorry, rest of the world, but we love to talk about testicles here.) So having balls or “eggs” can mean that a person is very brave, but also that they have no shame:

ACTOR 1
Qué fila tan larga, ¿no? Hola buenos días. Señor, la fila, la fila está por aquí. Ey, señor, ¿señor? ¡EY! ¿Epa, vieron cómo se saltó la fila? ¡Este tipo sí tiene bolas!
(What a long line, right? Hello, good morning. Sir, the line, the line is over here. Hey, sir, sir? HEY! Did you see how he skipped the line? This guy has some balls!)

7. Romper los huevos/ las bolas (Break the eggs/ the balls)

Ok, second and final reference to masculine genitals: romper los huevos means being very annoying. Insisting a lot, repeatedly doing something annoying, doing something over and over again. Wearing people out with repeating things… justo como probablemente estoy haciendo ahora perdón…(just like I’m probably doing right now, sorry…) 

8. ¿Tú quieres peo conmigo? (Lit.: Do you want a fart with me? / Do you want to fight me?) (Venezuela) 

In Venezuela, meterse en un peo (lit.: to get in a fart) means to get in trouble. So if you think someone’s trying to pick a fight with you, you can directly ask them: ¿Tú quieres un peo conmigo? (Do you want to fight me?) That way you can scare them off, and they’ll be like whoa, okay panita you know your Spanish, I don’t want no problems with you man, I’ll just move along.

9. Estoy re-caliente (Lit.:I’m super hot/I’m super furious) (Argentina) 

ACTOR 1
¡Hola! ¿Será que vamos a tomarnos algo?
(Hello! What do you say if we go get some drinks?)

ACTOR 2
No, ché. Es un re-mal momento. Estoy re-caliente.
(No dude. Really bad time. I’m super furious.)

ACTOR 1
Ah sí, me lo imaginé cuando vi tu auto chocado afuera.
(Oh yeah, I figured it out when I saw your crashed car parked outside.)

ACTOR 2
No, qué auto chocado, ¿eso qué importa? ¡Se comieron todo el dulce de leche!
(Who cares about the crashed car? They finished all of the dulce de leche!)

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